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deficit will be under $1 trillion for the first time since president obama took office. the c.b.o. also estimates the economy will grow 1.4% this year with unemployment remaining around 8%. c.b.o. director sat down with reporters this afternoon to discuss the economic and budget forecast. >> hello. thank you all for coming. i'm the director of the budget office. c.b.o. just released its outlook for the federal budget and the economy over the next decade. i'd like to tell you a little bit about if and then my colleagues and i will be happy to take your questions. our analysis shows that the united states continues to face very large economic and budget challenges. under current law we expect that the unemployment rate will remain above 7.5% through next year. that would make 2014 the sixth year in a row with unemployment so high. the longest such period in 70 years. also under current law, we expect the budget deficits over the next decade would total about $7 trillion. with deficits so high, the federal debt held by the public would remain a larger percentage of g.d.p. as in any year be
, and in terms of the sequester, i agree with the last guest. in many ways between the fed and the deficit spending on the deficit level, even though it's going to be smaller this year, it's hard to beat, that so i think the sequester, where we really demonstrate that the growth in many ways is paid for because when you stop it's going to take away jobs, those kind of black reality swans will be the issue for the market ahead. >> brian gendron, where are you on this and how do you want to be invested? >> we don't think this rally is over entirely. if you extrapolate a 5% or 6% return we've had so far this year, we'll have one of the greatest stock markets of all time in the face of, you know, good earnings but not great earnings, in the face of still slow growth. i think that's a little unrealistic so we'll probably get a little bit of a pullback, unusual if we didn't. still recommending a substantial allocation to equities. this year looks like last year, political uncertainty. last year was a good year for stocks. as for stocks versus bonds, i've been thinking it was the end of a 30-year
to the well again. the president insists he needs more money to reduce the deficit and will likely focus on a familiar target. white house correspondent wendell goaler tells us how that is going over. >> as the president headed to minnesota to talk about gun violence, republicans on capitol hill tried to keep the nation's attention on fiscal matters. >> we are having trouble in large part because spending is a problem. it is what is chasing jobs overseas and causing much anxiety about our future. >> sunday in a presuper bowl interview with cbs's scott kelly mr. obama said this year's tax changes shouldn't be the last. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down the deficit. he is not talking raising rates but closing loopholes especially those making money from investment pay a lower tax rate than income salaried or hourly wage earn ers. >> the average person doesn't have access to cayman island reports. they don't have access to interest income where they pay a much lower rate on billions of dollars they have earned. >> m
money to reduce the deficit and will likely focus on a familiar target. white house correspondent wendell goaler tells us how that is going over. >> as the president headed to minnesota to talk about gun violence, republicans on capitol hill tried to keep the nation's attention on fiscal matters. >> we are having trouble in large part because spending is a problem. it is what is chasing jobs overseas and causing much anxiety about our future. >> sunday in a presuper bowl interview with cbs's scott kelly mr. obama said this year's tax changes shouldn't be the last. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down the deficit. he is not talking raising rates but closing loopholes especially those making money from investment pay a lower tax rate than income salaried or hourly wage earn ers. >> the average person doesn't have access to cayman island reports. they don't have access to interest income where they pay a much lower rate on billions of dollars they have earned. >> mr. obama says the only way to continue investing
will be gradual. and on the downside we have thrown a lot of roadblocks in its path. we have a debt and deficit situation which in the long term are unsustainable, and we're doing absolutely nothing to correct that. nothing. i know cbo's forecast was that we would see modest improvement in the jet crashing into debt-to-gdp ratio the next two years but i don't believe the. i don't like their forecast. i do with 4% growth is going to venture lies with the 0% increase in the interest rate. just don't see it happening. if you get when you're going to get the other one taking up and that will be very, very difficult to maintain a stable or declining debt-to-gdp ratio. but even cbo has a debt-to-gdp ratio picking up at the end of the 10 year horizon. so we have to stabilize the debt. we haven't fixed the debt. and, in fact, we spread the crisis out so that we really won't go a month without one. we have the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. nothing was done in the later part of the year. and then in the 11th hour, actually it wasn't the 11th hour. it was about the 15th hour, two and half hours aft
we have had five straight trillion dollars worth of defense deficits to pump it up and we get $85 billion a month in transfusions a month from the fed and we are still limping along like a mature and quite frankly modest economy. >> eleanor? >> i think these numbers reflect the fact that government is shrinking and the defense department really pulled back in the last quarter of last year. it is a cautionary sign and looks like both parties are kind of sleepwalking their way toward a sequester. the ropes don't want to -- the republicans don't want to give up anything on the revenue side they would rather take a hit in spending. the democrats have protect social security, pell grants and medicaid, so they are not going to cave first. so if neither party blinks, the sequester will go ahead and we'll see further contraction in the economy. but you know, i'm not that glammy. i take my cue are from mark sandy, an accomplished economist. he says in 2013 we are going to go along with steady, modest growth but the housing market is truly come back and 2014 looks like. >>> tell mark the co
tax revenues in order to help the deficit. we'll have a conversation with represent dave camp coming up later in the program. stay with us. m charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 gives me tools that help me find opportunities more easily. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can even access it from the cloud and trade on any computer. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and with schwab mobile, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can focus on trading anyplace, anytime. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 until i choose to focus on something else. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all this with no trade minimums. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and only $8.95 a trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 open an account with a $50,000 deposit, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and get 6 months commission-free trades. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5411. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning today, my son brock and his whole team will be our new senior social media strategists. any questions? since we make radiator valves wouldn't it be better if we just let fedex help us to expand to new markets? hmm gotta admit that's better than a few "likes." i don't have the door code. who's that
that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the things that you need to do to accomplish that policy. i would say that we would also -- i would like to see stop this discussion about taxing the industry and trying to characterize it as subsidies, which is simply not true, and i would like to see more opportunities in terms of where we can open up areas that are off-limits right now. all those combined can generate an enormous amount of opportunity for the economy right when we need it. >> i will just mention a couple of things. i think lenders have been reall
that will really reduce the deficit. more taxpayers is going to result in the lower deficit than already this year. if we look at the last year we've seen the deficit go down because you've seen a little bit of success in the job market. not enough, but you have seen us reducing that deficit. that's really what the balancing act is all about. i would think that any fair-minded member of congress would want to see us balance and not just ask to solve the deficit crisis by forcing it all on the shoulders of people who defend upon important government programs. >> john: it seems inspiring that you're trying to sneak sanity into the budget debate. i commend you for it. you were there when the president laid out his gun control proposals. >> yes. >> are these campaign-style events the best way for him to drum up support for this issue? >> yes, and the reason why i think so, the american public supports common-sense gun-violence prevention. we support universal background checks closing the gun show loopholes. we support banning high-capacity clips and the american public understands this very clearly.
and revenue growth? clarification from washington. a grand bargain encompassing a deficit reduction for ten years like tax reform and titlement reform. discretionary titlement reform. and debt extension for maybe two years. first, the recession needs it stabilize there. but a clear road to fiscal, banking reforms and indication that europe is serious about improving competitiveness. third, resumption of growth in emerging economies led by china. finally, the fed successfully engineering a modest increase in interest rates without unleashing run away inflation. i know, tall orders. >> this is a tall order, bob. >> but this would create a huge boost of business confidence. capital expenditures and hiring would increase and revenues would rise. finally, sue, on a day when the dow passed 14,000, it is forth while noting that the last time the dow passed 14,000, valuations were much higher with the ratio for the s&p at that time was 22. about 14 right now. what does that mean? well, historic average for the s&p 500 is 15, it means the market was way overvalued, sue, in 2007. today it is somewhat
the deficit. all by honoring the wish of 2/3 of americans to respect states' rights for marijuana just like we do for alcohol. i would invite my colleagues to join this effort in developing a marijuana policy that makes sense for america today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. coble, for five minutes. mr. coble: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, january is the traditional month in which new year's resolutions are developed. i'm suggesting that president obama and mrs. boim adopt a resolution -- mrs. obama adopt a resolution. it appears to me, mr. speaker, regard air force one very casually and i believe on some occasions two planes, at least two planes go to the same destination. air force one, mr. speaker, belongs to president and mrs. obama. but air force one also belongs to the american taxpayer. and i would welcome a new year's resolution that would provide generous lace of all future air force one dispatches with prudence, discipline and last but certainly not least fiscal austerity. america's taxpayers will be
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
administration if we're going to pay off the deficit at some point. there is really no other way to do it without run away economic growth which we're not going to have. >> we're at a point where they have this so both sides are lined up for this battle going into may. if they propose any actual cuts in the senate on spending, i will buy you another one of those girlie drinks you have. >> all right. see, john. toby did get the last word. coming up, they were some of the biggest supporters of the health care law. but are unions starting to show buyers remorse? the cavuto on business gang on their new demand and why everyone may pay at the bottom of the hour. but up here first, nearly two-thirds of middle aged workers are doing something that someone here says could drive this number higher. whether you're young or old. this mid life headlines, or go to >>> you think 7.9% unemployment is a bad number? then get a load of this. nearly two-thirds of american workers age 45 to 60 now saying they're planning on delaying retirement. only 40% said that just two years ago and toby, you say thi
deficits, and that austerity was never given a credible grade, for example, by many investors, thinking, of course, it wasn't a great strategy. i concur. here's the problem, though. you know, austerity by definition is, you know, deficit cutting with less benefits and services. now, it is a horrible word. and, of course, many governments and politicians grabbed on to it because they really don't want deficit cutting and they don't want less benefits and services. but it is pretty hard to call it austerity as we go into, what, year six of post credit crisis activity. and global economics don't dictate we're doing a heck of a lot better, even though we had some jumps in growth, which kind of can be predicated on high levels of stimulus, maybe don't call it stimulus, maybe you call it just three to four years of big deficits. now, quid pro quo on the other hand seems to be the relationship that dictates who the big buyers are of very high quality, relatively speaking sovereign debt, whether it is boons, treasuries, guilts or ooth oaths. we need a whole lot less quid and a lot more pro grow
, yes, deficits and taxes and sequesters and potential government shutdowns, debt ceiling, we'll talk about that stuff. but we'll talk about it from the perspective on how we're making sure someone works hard in this country. a cop, teacher, a construction worker, or a reception worker, they can make it if they work hard. their kids can make it and dream bigger dreams than they have achieved. obviously, a lot of what we'll be working on over the next few weeks is going to be on how do we deal with this sequester issue. i want to make this quick point. i had a press conference this week in which i reiterated that i'm prepared, eager, and ang shouse that ends this government by crisis that every two week or every two months or every six months we are threatening this hard recovery, are finally housing is picking up and real estate is doing better and unemployment numbers are still too high. we're geing job growth and manufacturing is doing well and we continue to have these self-inflicted crisis here in washington where suddenly someone taps the brakes. what i said this week was i want
and the deficit and debt crisis, everyone is entrenched in their positions and sitting back and saying, i think sequestration is going to happen. you know who is going to take the brunt of it. the across the board nature of the cuts are going to hurt our ability to train and maintain, vehicles, ships and airplanes and the things that provide the readiness for our military are going to take a dramatic cut and we'll have done nothing to reform the way we spend money and put our country on a sound physical track. >> of course, pete, as we talk about cutting back, our enemies are ramping up and you see north korea doing more testing and iran moving possibly closer to nuclear weapons. do our enemies overseas pay attention to our budget woes and our plans here at home? >> sure they do. they look at our capabilities. they look at our disposition. they perceive us differently when we're perceived to be drawing back and pulling away from the world and cutting our capability. so, what happens in washington is watched very, very closely and that's why we have to demonstrate our commitment to maintaining t
this about reducing the deficit. >> there is no dow that we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so it does not have a huge impact. the average person cannot take advantage of them. they do not have access to cayman islands account. the average person does not have access to carried interest income. melissa: i do not know, how do you interpret that. that sounds like the tax man is coming. lori: we have been talking about eliminating loopholes and tax deductions for a while. melissa: we have not done it. lori: right. but it is not a new proposal to the people. melissa: he tries to hide behind the wealthy people. it is coming for everybody. anyway, fighting back. we will introduce you to a man training the troops fighting the cyber war. lori: what happened last night. the super bowl in the dark for 33 minutes. we will shed some light on the situation. ♪ i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i als
references to the trust deficit that has at times existed between this committee and the cia. if i'm confirmed, the address the deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable and i would make it my goal on day one of my tenure and every day thereafter to strengthen the trust between us. i have a reputation for speaking my mind, and at times doing so in a direct manner, which some attribute to my new jersey routes. -- roots. i would like to think that my candor would reassure you that you'll get straight answers from me, maybe not always those you will like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. that is the commitment i made to you. i would like to finish by saying a few words about the importance of taking care of the women and men who serve in the cia. because the of the secretiveness that the intelligence work requires, few americans will ever know the making sacrifices that these professionals and their families make every day. many have risked their lives and at times have given their lives to keep our country states. -- safe. i
love. the sequester is designed to get the deficit under control, but economists are worried that the cuts are so deep, they'll trigger a recession. today, the president called on congress to pass a budget package to avoid the sequester or at least delay the shock. >> if they can't get a bigger package done by the time the sequester is scheduled to go into effect, then i believe that they should at least pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of the sequester for a few more months until congress finds a way to replace these cuts with a smarter solution. >> pelley: in an interview on sunday, we asked the president about all of this. we found out last week that the economy actually shrank in the last three months of last year. if the federal spending cuts that are on tap for march actually take effect, will that push the country into recession? >> i don't know if it will push the country into recession, but here's what we know. the reason that the economy shrank a little bit, despite the fact that housing is re
and deficit. to put a plan in place. it's not just because we want to send a signal to the markets that washington's getting its act together. that's true. and that's a good result. but, it really is to help people. we don't want to see interest rates go up and the need for higher taxes. we don't want to see burden laid on the families, and individuals just coming out of school or seniors. we're trying to put us on a path to a growing economy, where there's more opportunity. >> but eric, you're still in a position of trying to sugarcoat a position of telling people that they are going to be getting less. that you're not going to make the same loans available, that this is a -- this is something that the president campaigned on very successfully. it's that situation. it's the immigration situation. are these different positions or this is just a new way of saying the same thing? >> look. what we're saying is our policies are the best path forward to help people in their lives. and the conservative principles of not spending money you don't have, of making sure that you put in place
and deficit debate is harmful to the business environment now? >> the uncertainty is back. the amount of -- the uncertainty is bad. you go from the fiscal cliff to the deficit debate to sequestration. that is inherently disruptive to business investment. certainty is a good multiplier. we are these long cycle businesses that have global competition. i do not have the lecture he to say that i will quit investing for six months until this is reserved. -- resolved. i will keep going. the people who can hurt the worst by all of this are the small and medium businesses. the people that have no buffer. that get confused. these are the people that are the heart of the u.s. economy. they are the ones that are constantly being bombarded as we go from one to another. this can only be solved here. this is one of the few cases where the business roundtable of people speak with one voice. it would be great to get a resolution. >> there is a divide in the corporate side on the corporate tax front. large companies would benefit more from corporate tax reform, especially going to a territorial system
. and, norah, even the president has endorsed this move in the past. it was part of his deficit reduction package last year. >> nancy cordes, thanks. >>> john brennan is said to make his case on capitol hill but a leaked memo will complicate tomorrow's hearing. it spells out the case for killing americans linked to terrorism. bill plante is at the white house. bill, good morning. >> reporter: charlie, good morning. the unclassified memo was written by the justice department and sent to some members of congress last summer. it was never intended to be sent to the public, but it was leaked. brennan is the architect of the drone program and now the leak has the white house on the defensive. administration officials argued forcefully tuesday that the targeted killing of terrorists who are american citizens often by drone strikes is acceptable policy in the battle to keep america safe. >> these strikes are legal, ethical, and wise. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there is an imminent threat and when we're confident it's doing so that's consistent with international law. >
a month but hardly enough and remember the seasonal adjuster factor affect bd i the deficit. >> one last question to you both. we did not extend the payroll tax this past year. what affect in the numbers from that? >> well, it is a little soon to really figure that out. i mean, it is true now that you mention it that the 157 in january is significantly off the pace of job creation in november and december. >> right. >> but i am quite certain that, you know, taking over 100 billion out of the 2013 economy already a bit wobbly by my lights is going to cost us on the growth and jobs side. >> yeah. one of the telling things was that in december there was a big jump in personal income because of people getting bonuses early and things like that. but spending didn't go up very much. and economists are expecting weak retail numbers for january. i think it's the seasonal adjustment factors again. my feeling is to see a drag in the third quarter. excuse me, the first quarter. and then have to be carried by the recovery of government spending because i don't think we have another drag on the econo
nervously. >> we have massive deficits, a big tax increase that no apparent willingness to get governnt off people's backs by reducing government spending, and all of that is a heavy, heavy weight on the private sector. firms around the nation are sitting on cash instead of creating jobs. >> reporter: on wednesday the commerce department announced economic growth actually fell to a-10% the last three months of last year, the chairman of the president's council of economic advisers says other indicators remain positive. >> consumer spending increased. business investment. residential construction. >> reporter: the jobs report showed a larger number of people dropped out of the labour force than down jobs. a former administration economist says some of that is to be expected. >> the population is aging, so we expect to have a fair number of people retiring every month for the next ten years or more as the baby boomers retire. >> reporter: the conference board reports a sharp increase in the number of older workers considering delaying retirement, which could make it more difficult for young p
. let's reform the defense budget and look at the largest drivers of our deficit in mandate spending programs those on the left end of the spectrum don't want to cut. >>brian: they took gates cuts and are going try to up them by $500 billion. leon panetta takes over from them. has the same fear. here's what he said yesterday on "meet the press." >> we've got a plan for that possibility because there are so many members saying we're going to let it take place, but i have to tell you it is irresponsible for it to happen. i mean, why -- why in god's name would members of congress elected by the american people take a step that would badly damage our national defense, but more importantly undermine the support for our men and women in uniform? why would you do that? >>brian: that is inaccurate. it is the president who proposed these sequester cuts. this isn't congress doing that. and republican fear about these cuts, would you say that's accurate? >> i would say it's accurate. there is a growing resignation to them on the hill for some reason. i was there two weeks ago. everyone seems re
, what is the surest way to create a more hopeful world for our children, how we will reduce our deficit, what kinds of tax plans will have, how we will make sure every child is getting a good every child, it is encouraging to me that you turned out so well by your mom not letting you watch tv. i am going to tell my daughters that when they complain. [laughter] in the midst of all these debates, we must keep that same humility that dr. king and lincoln, washington and all our great leaders, understood, is at the core of true leadership. a democracy as big and as diverse as ours, we will encounter every opinion, and our task as citizens, whether we are leaders in government or business or spreading the word, it is to spend our days with open hearts and open minds, to seek out the truth that exists in the opposing view, and find a common ground that allows for us as a nation, as a people to take real and meaningful action, tnd we have to do that, humbly, and we have to do it every day, not just at a prayer breakfast. i have to say this is now our fifth prayer breakfast, and it is always ju
a budget deficit we're worried about we're going to make you fund your pension plan 70 years in the future just to bankrupt you. >> they purposely tried to tank it. it's really sad. a lot of older people, rural americans who depend on medication, this will hurt them. the post office entire funding comes from postage. most people think it's taxpayer money. they had to sell off a lot of greatest properties they had the most beautiful post offices here in new york, and we can look at dianne feinstein's office husband for that. we'll look into it. >> micromanaged by congress but they don't get the taxpayer money from congress. it's a time bomb by the bush administration to make government smaller. >> john: exactly. >> and so everything that they want to see--yes--it comes to fruition. >> and all these people who sitting around all these year not attacking congress, congress attacks them. >> how does it make you feel? >> that was sent from you and it was anthrax. i regifted it. >> john: anyone who remembers the 80s and 90s postal workers are the people you do not want to upset. we'll talk about
there in deficit and the economy slightly diminishing, and, you know, this unemployment number, they can't afford to raise the rates. gerri: well, i hear you. i don't know if they are listening. rates slowly ticking higher here. will that do anything to the housing rebound. do you worry people will step back and not buy? >> no, not yet. when you look at it realistically, buy a $275,000 house with 5% down, your monthly payment is still less than in 1987 buying $175,000 house with 5% down. we're still in a better era today for housing than we have been in a long time, and rates are at 3.5%. i mean, that is still exponentially low. people need to understand where we were, where we are, and just move. if you want to refinance, it's time now. gerri: we're showing a graph, a chart of 30-year mortgage fixed rates from all the way back to 2008-2009, and it is the steep slope south to 20 # -- 2013. it's about comical people are worried about rates popping up because most people have never seen this in their lifetimes; right? how often in your career have you financed houses at this level? >> oh, this is u
. there is basically an aversion to paying taxes, and we have deficits caused by wars, tax cuts, and all of the things that we talked about, and there are more people retiring. we could say that is too bad, they lived to long -- right -- too long -- one i was growing up, my grandmother had no medicare, no social security, and she lived with her daughters. i slept on the couch in the living room because that is how families took care of seniors before 1964. now we have a medicare program, where my father lived to 93, my mother lived to 97, and we did nothing for them except pay for their taxes. one year we gave my mom a christmas gift, a hearing aid which cost about $800. host: medicare does not cover that? guest: medicare does not cover that. good luck, you are on your own is what we say to seniors. my view is we are a better country than that. we can find a way to do that. there is a lot of stuff done in this country where people are getting treatment or examinations that are not making their health better or their life better. we have to look at that and stop doing that kind of stuff. that means wit
or not tall from the standpoint of the deficit. the second point i want to make is in line with what bob said. if you were to make a typology of a foreign policy challenges of the united states, it might go something like this. there are crises that involve the of the values and the interest and the interests but not the values and both with some overlap. we pursue our interests hopefully not the point that we are right of a moral crisis that we generate. there are certain challenges which do not seem to involve our interests very much but to bring our values and to question and the classic example of that would have been rwanda and i will get back to that in a moment and then there was a majority of foreign policy challenges. syria and given the magnitude of the humanitarian crisis, the strategic importance of the country there is no greater blow that can be dealt to iran at this moment than the fall of the assad regime from there is no greater blow that can be dealt to hezbollah are dealt to hamas the in the fall of the regime. if one wants to be a coldhearted realist and put together of th
in a minute. can't borrow anymore. we've got a deficit that's, let's just call it morning friends a trillion. the c.b.o. estimate was a little bit below finally. but around the neighborhood of a trillion. that's 12 times 85. on top of that, you will... you have t danger of kicking off a worldwide financial panic as people start worrying about, well, is the united states going to default on its debt? if it comes down to paying social security payments or the interest on the debt, are we so sure that america will cut the social security payments and pay the interest on the debt? and a whole bunch of questions like that that we don't want anybody thinking about. we always want people thinking america is going to pay its obligations all of them. all of them. >> charlie: and america is. and we always have. i believe we will. but that's why i'm sorri about even if it's a small probability of a cataclysmic crash to the national debt ceiling, it wouldn't be good. >> reporter: do you think it's essential for the administration to lay out how it were to reform entitlements? >> not at this stage. charl
of faith in our form of government. i call it the trust deficit. it's a little bit like the fiscal deficit, the deficit of another kind but equally corrosive when people of a sudden conclude the system doesn't work and they no longer believe in participating and engaging in the system. the system is only as good as those are willing to participate and engage so i think those are the two biggest threats on the horizon. we can read and use the system with a sense of enthusiasm and direction and energy. i have no doubt about that. and it all has to do with the amount of progress we expect out of congress and whether or not we are smart enough to put this problem solving coalition together which can achieve results. then beyond that, if we can enhance the believe devotee of congress through simple things like reorienting the schedule so as joe said more time is wasting traveling to and from your district and actually sitting in washington touring the work of the people coming and if we can do simple things like no budget, no pay if you can't create a budget of spending bills by the time certai
building. he sold them a bill of goods, and what they got back was medicare part d, a ballooning deficit, and a financial crisis that devastated the country, a failed war -- a war in iraq that was ill-advised to put it mildly, and now the cuckoo's nest who he cultivated as the ground troops, they think they're in charge and they're not going to listen to him saying they're not. >> what was the big thing with karl rove? did he start a war to celebrate the tax cut or have a tax cut to celebrate the war. i mean, he put it all together. i forgot to mention the prescription drug thing thrown in without financing it. >> right, right, right. and, you know, he did do a great job, you know, mobilizing and energizing the right wing base to get behind george w. bush, and then he and others did a great job in the last few years under barack obama of energizing them by demonizing barack obama and pushing them to the fringe. and now he comes along and says, wait a second, you've gone too far. this monster that i have helped to create has gone too far, and i'm picking up the pitchfork and i got my fire
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)